an episode of the dog whisperer where caesar trains a dog to not be aggressive toward other animals?

an episode of the dog whisperer where caesar trains a dog to not be aggressive toward other animals?

Question by peeboo6es2003: an of the where a to not be other ?
I heard there was an episode of the dog where Caesar teaches someones dog to not be aggressive toward other animals. I have a pit and he is somewhat aggressive toward a cat and I want another pit, but I do not want him being this way with the new dog. Can anyone tell me what that episode of the dog was about? Thanks.

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Answer by Jaser
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Comments

    • Concerned dog trainer
    • May 23, 2012

    The show puts a “do not try this at home” warning for a reason. You need professional help, look for a positive trainer who is knowledgeable about Counter Conditioning and Desensitization methods. Some will tell you to “punish” your dog- this most likely will exacerbate the problem. Positive Reinforcement does not “allow” your dog to get away with bad behavior it changes how your dog perceives what use to be a cause (in his mind) for aggression, and teaches them a different behavior.

    I had a client who tried what they saw on the show, and nearly got bit, and made her behavior towards other dogs worse. It took awhile but with a head collar, the modification techniques mentioned above, and a lot of reinforcement she is much better, and they are much happier. Is she cured? No, you cannot “cure” problem behavior, but you can treat and modify it, if it is treatable. You definitely do not want to suppress the behavior, which is what punishment can do, since it can resurface in a more devastating manner.

    I have included some sites that give information about canine aggression, and include part of one entry found at merckvetmanual.com I hope they are of help.

    http://www.merckvetmanual.com/mvm/index.jsp?cfile=htm/bc/140215.htm
    Treatment of Behavioral Problems Associated with Canine Aggression:
    The treatment of aggression can be complex and may best be performed by a specialist. The first step in treating any aggression is to obtain an accurate diagnosis. Then, any provocative circumstances must be avoided--repetition of aggression teaches the dog to be better at executing it and reinforces the association between context and behavior. Most behavior modification focuses on counterconditioning and desensitization using food treats or rewards. Owners must understand the difference between treats and bribes; the latter will guarantee treatment failure. The dog should be taught to defer to the owner for everything it wants. The goal is not to make the dog "submissive," but rather to teach the dog to attend to the owner for cues as to the appropriateness of its behavior. Dogs defer to other dogs by sitting or lying down and waiting for cues that tell them when they can proceed with their next behavior. Sitting or lying down acts as a "stop" command and allows owners to regain control of the situation. These dogs must earn all of their attention--even maintenance attention (eg, feeding, walking). Head collars (head halters, eg, Gentle Leader(R) or Halti(R)) can be a great help in treating or preventing problem canine behaviors involving aggression and can render any aggressive dog safer. Almost without exception, physical punishment, including the use of prong collars and electric shock collars, alpha rolls, and dominance downs can make an already aggressive dog worse. Owners should be discouraged from using these techniques, especially in the absence of supervision. Antidepressants (eg, amitriptyline, clomipramine, fluoxetine) have been helpful in treating anxiety associated with the aggression and in facilitating behavior modification. Currently, all behavioral treatment with psychotropic agents is extra-label, requires informed consent, and should be performed only after a thorough physical examination and laboratory evaluation (CBC and serum biochemistry profile).

    • APBTmommy
    • May 23, 2012

    I LOVE that show! lol! I don’t know what episode you’re talking about because there have been a lot of episodes like that, but as far as your pit being animal aggressive, that’s really normal for the breed. It is not normal for them to be human aggressive at all, but they were bred to fight animals, so some animal aggression, to a point, is normal.

    My husband and I own three American Pit Bull Terriers and they all get along wonderfully! We got our male first and then we got a female. It took our male a couple days to really accept her, but he wasn’t aggressive and they have never had a problem. We just recently got our third APBT, another female, and when we brought her home it took our other two a few days to accept her, but again, everything went fine and we have never had a problem. With pits (just like any breed) if they are well socialized starting at a young age, they shouldn’t even be animal aggressive. None of ours are animal aggressive, they are all very friendly dogs! : ) I don’t know your dog so I can’t tell you if it would be okay to get a second dog, but if your dog isn’t really dog aggressive and you get a puppy of the opposite sex (fixed of course) I don’t think you would have many, if any, problems at all.

    Good luck! : )

    Oh, the new episode last night was about a Lab that ate the owners pet chickens, and I think he also went to a place and helped a Boxer and a APBT to not be as dog aggressive. I can’t remember if that was in last nights episode or if that was before that though? I do remember that the Lab that killed the chickens was last night though. Maybe his website could help you out? http://channel.nationalgeographic.com/channel/dogwhisperer/

    • Kaija
    • May 23, 2012

    um.. yeah, in most cases of extreme animal aggression it would not be advisable to try and do it yourself.. regardless of watching the show.. He has many cases, but in the extreme cases he uses a PACK of dogs to help in training.. Get a professional to help..

    • Dave
    • May 23, 2012

    Every episode of the Dog Whisper goes like this….

    1) dog/dogs has/have behavior issue

    2) Ceaser’s comes up with the dramatic idea of “Walk the Dog”

    3) Ceaser uses tells the owner not to reward bad behavior

    4) Ceasar tells the owner to walk their dog

    5) repeat steps 1-4 with another dog or two and get some $ $ $ from petco

    Seriously though, Ceaser deals with this weekly. Buy his book, it’s better than the show and use a dog trainer in your area for your main assistance

    • blessed1
    • May 23, 2012

    If you type in The Dog Whisperer in your search and go to his website. You can order the complete series on dvd. There’s lots of info on his site too. There was just an episode on this week where these people’s German Shepherd wanted to kill their cat.
    I would get some obedience classes too.

    • Laura ♥
    • May 23, 2012

    Take your pit to a real trainer. Sign up for some real obedience lessons.

    As a pit owner, it’s your job to represent responsible pit / pet ownership.

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