Do the shocking dog collars work well with keeping a dog in a yard?

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A asked..
I have a fenced in but my dog just jumps the .we have to keep him on a and he still pops his head out of ANY collar!do dog collars work?or any other suggestions?

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Comments

    • murphy
    • March 13, 2010

    Sure didn’t work on the golden mix I got from a rescue group. He was found wandering around, wearing a broken invisible fence collar, a choke collar, and no ID. Somebody put too much trust in the invisible fence.

    • trebobnagrom
    • March 13, 2010

    Not im my experience. It sounds like you have a very determined dog. I have used one of those buried fence things witht the shock coller and I’m sure it hurt but the dog kept going anyway. My lab learned that if he just kept running he would get out of the recievers range and the collar would stop working. Try some obedience training. It will take tons of time and patience, but it will pay off.

    • jenshensnest
    • March 13, 2010

    If your fence is 6 ft or more in height, use a barbed wire that is angled in to your yard so when he tries to jump he cannot get up over.If you have seen a prison yard you should know to what design I am refering, otherwise find a picture on the internet so you can see what I am talking about.

    • gspguy
    • March 13, 2010

    Electronic collars are more humane that letting your dog get hit by a car, truck, etc…

    However, they do not train your dog, that is your job. Just because a dog has an e-collar on does not make it a well behaved dog. A dog must be trained, preferably on a pinch collar to start with until they understand what command you want them to do. The pinch collar, transfers well to an e-collar because the stimulation is in the same area and very similar. So making a command and correction with a pinch collar, is similar to doing the same with an e-collar, you can just do it from a farther range.

    Once a dog understands that it will give them a new found freedom, he will look forward to you pulling it out and going for a good run. I use mine for hunt training, but I use it for general obedience as well. I can walk 3 dogs, off of one unit (3 collars), off leash to the local elementary school. I can let them run the entire field, which is about 10 acres, and only when they start to stray do I give them a light shock, correcting them to stay closer to me. I can be there with all my dogs, half of the field being taken up by a soccer game with lots of people, and keep my dogs on our half of the field so that they don’t bother anyone else, but still get their exercise. One or two light corrections is usually all I need to set the boundries for my dogs.

    As far as the fence jumping thing…..start on a lead with a pinch collar. The collar must be snug when you put it on, which means it should be snug enough that you have to pull the links apart to get it on the dogs neck. Get him up to the fence, have someone on the other side of the fence trying to coax him over. When he tries to jump up on the fence, give him a quick correction. You shouldn’t have to pull to hard, a little pressure goes a long way with a properly sized pinch collar. Two or three corrections, should do it if someone continues to try to coax him over, he should stop jumping up. Give lots of praise when he does what you want him to do. I would do this twice a day, for a few weeks, this may take care of your problem altogether.

    If you are interested in using an e-collar, buy a good one, I use tri-tronics. The only issue is that if you put him in the back yard with the e-collar on to prevent him from jumping the fence, you have to watch him like a hawk, and everytime he tries to get up on the fence you have to make a correction until the behavior changes. If he sometimes get a correction and sometime not, he won’t learn anything.

    Find a trainer who advocates use of an e-collar, and have them teach you how to use it. They are a great tool that will give you peace of mind, and your dog a new found freedom, because you can control him from a greater distance.

    Best of luck.

    Aside – All dog training should be positive, because if the dog does what you want, positive reinforcement is the key to changing behavior. If you don’t use any negative reinforcement, you can never change a dog’s behavior. Waiting for a dog to do something you want to give positive reinforcement, takes way longer to train than if you make the dog do something you want to give it positive reinforcement. I have never heard anyone having success through only positive training.

    Also, if used properly, they will not cause any physical or mental harm.

    • simi
    • March 13, 2010

    I am a positive dog trainer. The use of electronic devices using “special” collars are really a soft term to lessen the impact of the truth – you are using electric shock on your beloved pet. Raise the height of your fence instead. Electroshock has been proven to harm animals both physically and behaviorally – why would you want to do that? You could very well be setting your dog up to cause him to bite a person or other dog in the future by using electroshock. Find a positive based trainer in your area, try using the APDT as a referral source.

    • iatebethy
    • March 13, 2010

    that is horrible!!why would any one do that?im sure it works but it is so mean!!!

    • Dawn A
    • March 12, 2010

    yes they do work and they are not cruel to the dogs,a little shock is better than the injuries or death it can have from a car when it jumps the fence.I used one on a
    Great Dane I had for awhile she too would jump the fence.the collars don’t hurt the dogs it startles them more than anything.I put it on my bare skin and it didn’t hurt me.good luck

    • mopar_murph
    • March 12, 2010

    They are not “cruel devices”. They don’t hurt that bad, I know because I tried them out on myself, highest setting, BEFORE putting one on my dog. Well, actually it was automatice bark collar – which only worked for 2 days. After that he was too smart and figured out he could turn the collar around his neck and it wouldn’t shock him anymore…
    But as far as the shock goes, it’s strong enough to get their attention. It only takes a couple times of getting zapped before they figure they better not do what they were doing anymore.

    • journey014644
    • March 12, 2010

    yes they do because the collars keep the dogs in the yard by giving them a quick jolt of pain and then after a while the dog will realize that crossing the boundaries will result in pain

    • preciousdobes
    • March 12, 2010

    It work’s well with most dogs. There are the few that will run through them but since your yard is fenced, the dog is not going to take the time to jump a fence while being shocked. And it’s not cruel. In your dogs defense I’m sure he rather run around the yard then be tied up.

    • tekressel
    • March 12, 2010

    Invisible Fence, installed professionally works VERY well!!! The “do-it-yourself” versions are iffy. Depending on where you live, there may be other companies that also do professional installations. If your dog is slipping out of collars, the collars you’re using aren’t fit properly. Basic adult dog obedience classes will help too.

    • steveb106
    • March 12, 2010

    They work, but make sure the lines are spaced very far away from each other.

    Funny/sad story coming.

    Installed one of the same kind of “invisible fences” like you’re thinking of, buried the lines to where it would go out our garage door and into our back yard (they didn’t really give us a lot of line to work with). Apparently we put the lines too close together, we had the setting on “medium” after attempting a “low” setting and our dog running away (cocker spaniel mix, not but maybe 40 pounds). We let our dog out and it immediately started yelping as it ran out into the yard, started running in circles then immediately ran back into the garage whimpering and shaking.

    When it first happened I was upset that the dog was hurt (and coincidentally got rid of the “invisible fence”), but looking back it was kinda funny at the same time.

    Call me cruel but I’d laugh if it was a human that did that too.

    • yali
    • March 12, 2010

    No!!! They are very cruel devices. If you don’t believe me why don’t you try putting one on your neck and having it snap you. Its very inhumane.

    • paprincess4u
    • March 12, 2010

    yes

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